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1939: Smith flies home with children in tow

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1939: Smith flies home with children in tow

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June 1, 1939

HARTINGTON — Among today’s modern mothers is Mrs. Norman Smith, who will visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Miller, until June 10. Arriving Monday morning, Mrs. Smith, her two sons, Pat, age five, and Jimmy, 18 months, had covered 234 air miles between Des Moines, Omaha and Sioux City in less than 105 minutes. Even the stewardess on the Des Moines-Omaha flight commended the mother, for this was her first experience in the air. There were no other passengers on board between the two cities, so the service was “grand” in Mrs. Smith’s words. Leaving Des Moines shortly after 2:30 Sunday, the trio landed in Omaha at 3:30 in the afternoon.

June 1, 1939

HARTINGTON — The site of the sinking of the United States’ navy submarine, The Squalis, was visited three weeks ago by a popular Hartington couple, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Lammers — though their visit took place 10 days before the catastrophe in which 26 seamen lost their lives. The Hartingtonites crossed the Kiterie bridge near Portsmouth, N.H., enroute to New England from New York City. The bridge spans the bay in which the sub went down carrying its human cargo to death in the icy depths.

June 1, 1939

HARTINGTON — Pointing out the significance of the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, P.H. Robinson, Hartington attorney, spoke before a large crowd at Paragon Tuesday morning. He emphasized that the World War, as viewed today, failed to fulfill the two conclusions drawn at that time; first, that the World War would save democracy, and second, that it would end all wars. Today’s international situation verifies this.